Upcoming Events:
LECTURES

For video clips and more information about our lectures, visit our Facebook page.

2019 Lecture Series

Lectures occur each month from January through May/June. Lectures take place in the History Center’s John Williams Classroom. Seating for lectures are limited. Complimentary refreshments are provided. Lectures are FREE, but donations are gladly accepted.

The lecture series includes FREE programs presented by experts on a variety of topics. Typically, lectures are about one hour, and include some face-to-face time with acclaimed authors, professors, and researchers on historical, artistic, and cultural topics. The 2019 Lecture Series has been sponsored by Martin North. 

2019 Lecture Series Schedule:

Looking Beyond the Temples and Beyond the Capital: Exploring the residences of the ancient Angkorians :- Thursday, March 29, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

 

Each year the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum brings archaeologists, historians, authors, and scientists from all over the Pacific Northwest for their free lecture series.  The series takes place each year January through June.  The March presentation will focus on the latest archaeological work in Angkor, Cambodia with Professor Alison Carter. Carter has done extensive archaeological work in Cambodia and will share her discoveries with the community of Cannon Beach on Thursday, March 28 at 4:00 p.m.

Angkor, centered in the modern nation of Cambodia, was one of the largest preindustrial settlements in the world and has been the focus of more than a century of epigraphic, art historical, and architectural research. However, few scholars have examined the lives of the people who built the temples, kept the shrines running, produced the food, and managed the water. This presentation will discuss two recent excavations that examined Angkorian residential occupation. First, she will discuss excavations on a house mound within the enclosure of the state temple of Angkor Wat. Then she will discuss their 2018 excavations on occupation mounds near the small provincial temple of Prasat Basaet, across the Tonle Sap lake from the Angkorian capital in the province of Battambang. Through this multidisciplinary research they aim to better understand the nature and timing of occupation at these sites, the types of activities taking place within an Angkorian household and compare life in the capital with life in the provinces.

Alison Carter is Assistant Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Oregon. She holds her degrees from the University of Wisconsion, Madison (M.S. and Ph.D.) and Oberlin College. Professor Carter is an anthropological archaeologist with interests in the political economy and evolution of complex societies in Southeast Asia, the archaeology of East and South Asia, materials analysis and LA‐ICP­‐MS (Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry), craft technology and specialization, household archaeology, ritual and religion, trade and exchange, and bead studies.household archaeology in Angkor, Cambodia. She is also an Archaeology Institute of America featured speaker. And she lives right here in the Pacific Northwest!

This event is free to the public and has been sponsored by the Ocean Lodge, Clatsop County and Martin Hospitality.  Seating for Professor Carter’s presentation is very limited so please arrive a little early to get a seat, grab a cup of coffee or tea, and peruse the museum before the lecture starts at 4:00 p.m. Doors are closed at 4:15 p.m.

This event has been sponsored by The Ocean Lodge, Clatsop County, and Martin North.


Returning Sea Otters; Repairing the Coast :- Monday, April 22, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

Let’s celebrate Earth Day by talking about some of the cutest coastal creatures – otters! Expert Bob Bailey will give a presentation on coastal sea otters and how we can help their populations.

Coffee, tea, cookies – and a free lecture. What could be better?

This is a free event and is open to the public. Please arrive before 4:15 as the doors will be closed at that time. Seating is limited.


D.B. Cooper & the Exploding Whale: Folk Heroes of the Northwest :- Thursday, April 25, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

 

The 2018 Cottage & Garden Tour’s luncheon and lecture was sold out over a week in advance thanks to our phenomenal speaker, Oregon author Bill Sullivan. Sullivan is an acclaimed author, historian and adventurer who has an uncanny way of discovering history that even the experts didn’t know.

Is it hard to believe that the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum has invited him back for their 2019 lecture series? Don’t miss his return this April 25 at 4:00 p.m.

Author William L. Sullivan takes us on a slide show tour of legendary Northwest folk heroes from Sacajawea and D.B. Cooper to Bigfoot. Expect entertaining and educational tales about the historical figures that helped define the spirit of the Pacific Northwest — as told by the author of the thriller, “The Case of D.B. Cooper’s Parachute”.

Sullivan has written four novels and a dozen nonfiction books about the Northwest, including “Hiking Oregon’s History” and “Oregon Favorites.” His journal of a 1000-mile hike he took across Oregon, “Listening for Coyote,” was chosen by the Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission as one of Oregon’s “100 Books,” the 100 most significant books in the state’s history.

Sullivan is an engaging lecturer who keeps attendees on the edge of their seats. You won’t want the lecture to end! This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited for this presentation, so arrive early and get a cup of coffee or tea. The doors will close at 4:15 p.m.

This event has been sponsored by The Ocean Lodge!


Did Francis Drake and the Golden Hind Land at Whale Cove in 1579? :- Thursday, May 16, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We don’t always talk about Sir Francis Drake, but when we do, we like to talk about his connections to Oregon. May is all things ships, wrecks, and lore. Who better to clear things up than Melissa Darby, M.A.

Melissa is an anthropologist and an archaeologist with over thirty years experience in the field. She can speak on the enthnobiology of the people of the Lower Columbia, theory relating to Sir Francis Drake landing in Oregon, architecture of the Northwest Coast People including Kalapuya, Oregon Coast and Chinookan peoples, and on a skillet possibly from the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Her power point presentations incorporate old photographs, maps, drawings and splendid animation.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating for this presentation is limited, so arrive early to get your seat. Doors close at 4:15 p.m.

This event has been sponsored by Cannon Beach Vacation Rentals!

 

 

 

 

 

 


Haystack Rock: A Marine Reserve :- Thursday, June 20, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haystack Rock. It’s that beautiful monolith surrounded by beautiful tide pools and home to many sea birds. We’ve asked Haystack Rock Awareness Program director Melissa Keyser to come give us a talk on all things Haystack Rock.

The Haystack Rock Awareness Program was started in the 1980’s and has continued to protect the intertidal and bird ecology of Haystack Rock’s marine garden and Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Keyser has truly found her passion with the Haystack Rock Awareness Program. A love of the environment and our beautiful shores shine through in everything she does. You won’t want to miss this talk as Keyser explores what it means to be a marine garden and wildlife refuge.

Seating for this presentation is limited. Arrive early to get a up of tea or coffee. Doors close at 4:15 p.m.


Archaeology & Science at Paisley Caves :- Saturday, October 26, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

Each year the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum partners with the Archaeological Institute of America to bring archaeology to our community. Over the past few years we’ve talked about everything from early settlements in the Americas to pyramid construction in ancient Egypt.

This year, we welcome Dr. Dennis Jenkins on Saturday, October 26 at 4:00 p.m. Jenkins was a huge part of the ground-breaking work at Paisley Caves. The archaeological work conducted there changed how archaeologists world-wide looked at settlement of the Americas, even pushing dates back further than ever expected!

Dennis Jenkins is a Senior Research Archaeologist for the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the University of Oregon where he received his PhD in 1991. He has taught and directed the UO’s Northern Great Basic archaeological field school in the Fort Rock, Chewaucan, and Harney basins of Oregon, and the Snake River Plain in Idaho since 1989. Jenkins’ research focuses on the first colonization of the Americas. When did people arrive and by what method and direction? He has also investigated obsidian sourcing and hydration, prehistoric shell bead trade, and prehistoric settlement-substance patterns of the Northern Great Basin. He has conducted more than 100 site investigations throughout his career, authored and co-authored 11 books, 80 chapters, articles, reviews, professional reports, and contributions to reports, and given 70 papers at professional meetings. Most recently, he has been involved in the internationally recognized recovery of ancient human DNA from coprolites (dried feces) dating to 14,500 years and established the contemporaneity of Western Stemmed projectile points at the Paisley Caves with Clovis technology, co-authoring 5 articles in the World’s most prestigious scientific journals Science and Nature, made appearances in 11 TV documentaries, and had his work profiled in more than 50 newspaper and magazine articles including Parade magazine and New Yorker.

Jenkins will focus on Luther Cressman’s 1938-1940 excavations at the Paisley Caves in south central Oregon that discovered exciting evidence suggesting that people may have lived there as early as the Late Pleistocene (Ice Age), some 12,000 to 15,000 years ago. However, it was not until more recent developments in radiocarbon dating and ancient DNA analysis that he was proven correct. This presentation explains the scientific processes and results of archaeological and paleogenetic investigations at the Paisley Caves, bringing the audience and the most up-to-date information about the evidence for the association of humans and Pleistocene animals in Oregon’s high desert country more than 14,000 years ago. Dating of camel and horse bones, artifacts, twigs, and dried human feces containing Native American DNA between 12,900 and 14,500 years ago indicates that people lived in the caves and apparently hunted mammoth or mastodons, camels, horses, and other animals at the end of the Pleistocene (Ice Age) period. This colorful slide show takes the audience through the scientific processes involved in proving the case for pre-Clovis (>13,500 years) human occupations at the world famous Paisley Caves in south-central Oregon.

Seating is limited for this presentation, so arrive early. The doors will close at 4:15 p.m. This event is free and open to the public.

Read more: https://www.archaeology.org/issues/145-1409/features/2370-peopling-the-americas-paisely-caves

This event has been sponsored by The Inn at Arch Cape!


How Did the Corps of Discovery Survive the North Coast Winter :- Saturday, November 9, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

Join us for our annual membership meeting on Saturday, November 9, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. The Cannon Beach History Center & Museum welcomes interpreter and historian, Tom Wilson.

Tom Wilson, a retired elementary school teacher (30 years), began working at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park seasonally more than 20 years ago. After a great deal of research on the Lewis and Clark Expedition, he began giving talks, demonstrations, and presenting programs to students and visitors. Tom recently retired from the Park Service. During his time with the park, he participated in the park’s living history programs and has portrayed Corps members at events such as The Salt Makers Return, Clark’s Camp and Wintering Over. Tom portrayed William Clark in documentaries such as OPB’s Searching for York, as well as having been featured on Oregon Field Guide and Grant’s Getaways, and A Clatsop Winter Story produced by the National Park Service. Tom has conducted and/or helped with many tours along the Lewis and Clark Trail. Among these were tours with Dr. Gary Moulton (editor of the Lewis and Clark Journals), Shore Excursions of America, and Road Scholar groups, as well as numerous talks and presentations throughout the Northwest.

Join Lewis and Clark historian Tom Wilson, and discover how the Expedition survived the harsh North Coast winter. Learn how they established winter quarters, found food, made their clothing, how they were able to obtain salt to preserve meat for their homeward trek, and made the treacherous journey to present day Cannon Beach to obtain whale blubber and oil to add to their lean elk diet.

Dangerously low on food, provisions and trade goods, their leather leather clothing rotten from continuous rain, the Lewis and Clark Expedition had a number of critical decisions to make once they arrived at the mouth of the Columbia River. Not finding enough game to feed the 33 members and finding that the trade goods they had left was not sufficient to trade with the local natives for food, the Corps needed to find appropriate quarters as winter was approaching all too quickly.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating for this event is limited, so arrive early. The doors will close at 4:15 p.m.