Upcoming Events:
LECTURES

For video clips and more information about our lectures, visit our Facebook page.

2020 Lecture Series

Lectures occur each month from January through May/June. Lectures take place in the History Center’s John Williams Classroom. Seating for lectures are limited. Complimentary refreshments are provided. Lectures are FREE, but donations are gladly accepted.

The lecture series includes FREE programs presented by experts on a variety of topics. Typically, lectures are about one hour, and include some face-to-face time with acclaimed authors, professors, and researchers on historical, artistic, and cultural topics. The 2020 Lecture Series has been sponsored by Martin North. 

2020 Lecture Series Schedule:

A Deadly Wind: The 1962 Columbus Day Storm :- Thursday, January 16, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cannon Beach History Center & Museum’s winter lecture series will kick-off on Thursday, January 16 at 4:00 p.m. with a presentation by author and historian, John Dodge.

John Dodge was a columnist, editorial page writer, and investigative reporter for The Olympian prior to retiring in 2015 from an award-winning career that spanned 40 years. He and his wife, Barbara Digman live in the Olympia area and enjoy gardening, bird-watching, hiking, reading and traveling.

Dodge will be talking about his latest book, “A Deadly Wind: The 1962 Columbus Day Storm.” The book is a non-fiction account of the strongest windstorm in West Coast recorded history. The storm killed dozens, injured hundreds, damaged more than 50,000 homes and leveled enough trees to build a million homes. The unrivaled cyclone gave birth to the Asian log export market and the Oregon wine industry. In A Deadly Wind, veteran journalist, John Dodge weaves a compelling story spiced with human drama, Cold War implications, Pacific Northwest history and the science of severe weather. The best-selling book was published by Oregon State University press in October 2018.

Copies of Dodge’s book will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to the public thanks to the support of Clatsop County, Martin North, and Bob & Sandi Lundy. Seating for this event is limited, and the doors will be locked at 4:15 p.m., so arrive early.

Professor Scott Fitzpatrick

Anthropocene: Humanities Impact on Bio Systems – Thursday, February 20, 2020

The Cannon Beach History Center & Museum will host professor Scott Fitzpatrick as part of their annual off-season lecture series. Fitzpatrick will be talking about humanities impact on bio systems, ancient and present. The presentation will take place on Thursday, February 20 at 4:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Scott M. Fitzpatrick is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Associate Director of the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the University of Oregon. He is an archaeologist who specializes in the prehistory and historical ecology of island and coastal regions, particularly the Pacific and Caribbean. Much of his research has focused on prehistoric colonization events, seafaring strategies, and adaptations to smaller islands, exchange systems, and human impacts on ancient environments. Dr. Fitzpatrick is the founding Co-Editor of the Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology and has published several books and more than 120 journal articles and book chapters.

There is a general consensus that we are now living in a new geological epoch called the “Anthropocene”; a time marked by human domination of Earth’s bio systems. While the exact timing of this is still debated, there is no question that humans have caused widespread, and in some cases irreversible, damage to the environment. In this talk, I discuss these issues using islands as case studies, which serve as ideal model systems for examining how Homo sapiens, through various cultural processes, have modified, disrupted, and permanently altered these pristine ecologies.

This event is free and open to the public thanks to the support of Cannon Beach Vacation Rentals, Clatsop County, Martin North. Seating for this event is limited, and the doors will be locked at 4:15 p.m., so arrive early.

Topic TBA – Thursday, March 19, 2020

Join anthropologist, ethnohistorian, archivist, educator and author David Lewis on Thursday, March 19 at 4:00 p.m.

This event is free and open to the public thanks to the support of Seasprite, Clatsop County, Martin North. Seating for this event is limited, and the doors will be locked at 4:15 p.m., so arrive early.

 

Turtle that washed up in Cannon Beach, undated.

 

Sea Turtles and Microplastic Removal in Cannon Beach – Thursday, April 16, 2020

Come celebrate Earth Day with the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum and Marc Ward on Thursday, April 16 at 4:00 p.m..  Ward is the co-founder Sea Turtles Forever and Blue Wave, Sea Turtles Forever’s microplastic response team.

Sea Turtles Forever is a small non-profit based out of the North Coast of Oregon. The Blue Wave team has been involved in marine plastic fragment research, filtration system development, and group clean up events since 2008. Using a simple, yet innovative technique they are removing micro-plastics out of North Coast beaches on a large scale.

While not filtering plastics out of the sand on the Oregon Coast, Sea Turtles Forever runs patrols with a team in Costa Rica to protect vital nesting habitat of sea turtles.

Sea Turtle washed up in Cannon Beach, undated. Back end.

Ward  will be presenting on Sea Turtles in Oregon and micro-plastic removal operations in Cannon Beach.

This event is free and open to the public thanks to the support of Clatsop County, Martin North. Seating for this event is limited, and the doors will be locked at 4:15 p.m., so arrive early.